Dr. DARREN CHUA

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12October

2016

Leadership Mindset

As leaders, have we ever reflected upon how the role of our mindset plays in the way we approach our leadership, as well as our leadership styles? 

A mindset can be defined to comprise the entirety of our attitudes, beliefs and expectations we hold that act as the foundation of who we are – which in turn shapes how we lead and the ways we interact with our team. Our mindset determines how we think, as well as how we interpret the situations occurring around us. It impacts the quality of our relationships, as well as moderating the way we live and lead our lives.
Over the years of both working with as well as honing various leaders, I believe there are four important perspectives in a mindset we need to adopt in order to be a good and effective leader.

I call these the S.T.A.R. mindset:

S – Sight
A leader’s sight enables us to be excited about the future, and they allow the team to be able to see the vision that we dare to place upon ourselves. It is the end in mind; the goal in which the team strives towards together with the leader.

T – Testament
It is almost a cliché, but also a truism that great leaders must not only “talk the talk,” but also “walk the talk”. Actions speak louder than words. A good visualization of the team’s success and heights the team can reach can only be achieved through concrete, actionable steps and actions taken in order to inch towards the end goal in mind. Without actions, ideas would remain afloat, and visions would only remain as dreams.

A – Assurance
One of the foundations of good leadership is the assurance and the determination we give to our team members. The amount of commitment that you bring as leaders sends a powerful message of commitment to your team mates. Leaders lead by example and lead a group together by trudging forward with them, whereas bosses only give directions for his subordinates to follow.

R – Responsibility
As leaders, we take the lead in all aspects of the team’s functioning and performance and we are willing to be accountable for our actions and results. A good leader will take ownership of the actions and decisions made by him or herself, as well as those of the team – shifting of blame or finger-pointing is extremely detrimental for team dynamics, and would not attribute to good leadership as it slows team growth and progress.

Edited by Ms Sakeena Tan

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